Monday, November 23, 2015

Cardiff Rail Trail supporters respond

Earlier this month we heard from Cardiff Rail Trail opponents. This week trail advocates respond. From the Inbox:
Many of us are just waking up to the well orchestrated campaign by the opponents to the Cardiff Rail Trail. There is a sudden blitz of posts on Nextdoor, a discussion on this blog, a web site that generates automated emails to the City Council, and a flurry of articles and op-end pieces.

I am dismayed by the sudden explosion of activity. Those of us that support the rail trail on the east side of San Elijo feel like we've fought this battle already in an extensive series of public meetings which were widely advertised and well attended.

Now we see this attempt to reverse a decision that a vocal minority didn't like. These very loud voices claim to represent a groundswell of opposition to the project. That isn't right. They don't represent the whole community, they are late to the party, and their arguments are biased and one sided.

There is a lot of misinformation that has gone unchallenged for too long. The web site, posts, and op-ed pieces are based on highly biased, inaccurate, and often incomplete data. The strident tone is very reminiscent of the debate we had at the time the proposals were first being considered; back then we felt like we were actually being bullied in some of the public meetings by these folks.

Those of us who love the current plan for the trail are not organized and have been slow to respond to the ambush. However, a few of us have put up a web site with the facts (clearing up some of the fog that our opponents have woven around the issue). Please check out yesrailtrail.com (and if you wouldn't mind, also post as a resource like you did with the web site with the opposing point of view).

Many of us are still hugely supportive of the vision for the east side rail trail. We can't wait for the trail to be built in 2017.

As envisioned, the rail trail will link our community with Cardiff's market area and with downtown Encinitas. It fits beautifully with the other projects in the surrounding area, including the Santa Fe Pedestrian Underpass (thank you for that), the Chesterfield intersection re-vamp, and the Montgomery at-grade crossing. The coordinated development happening here is a rare example of a tapestry of improvements that will level up the whole area. These projects all complement each other.

The alternative that was discussed for the rail trail - which was to expand the existing bike lanes on 101 - will keep the Santa Fe underpass isolated from the majority of pedestrian traffic flow, create a mess on Second Street in Encinitas where the trail hits the city, and leave San Elijo Avenue in a state that's far from ideal.

We are so tired of dodging cars when we try to walk along San Elijo Avenue to Seaside Market or downtown Encinitas from our house... it's aggravating and dangerous given that drivers who are parking are often paying more attention to traffic on San Elijo than pedestrians who trying to walk through what is effectively their parking lot. Also, pedestrians are often forced out into the road with speeding traffic because cars - and large pickup trucks - park at 90 degrees rather than at a slant or parallel. Finally, the area is just not pedestrian friendly or pretty.

We need the trail on the east side of the road. We're thrilled about the plan and are counting the days until construction starts.

We understand that the white-hot issue of the fence along the tracks and the plan for the rail trail are not linked in the way the opponents would like us to believe (this is their #1 argument against the trail). With or without the trail, NCTD will eventually have to fence off the tracks at some point to reduce the potential for fatalities caused by people trying to cross the tracks illegally. This is a major safety issue. The problem will only get worse as rail traffic increases, especially with the double-tracking project reaching completion in the coming years. Fencing off the tracks is a foregone conclusion and is coming whether we like it or not; better to have it accompanied by a delightful rail trail that connects our community together and makes San Elijo a walkable and bike-able corridor.

I hope you hear more from those of us who haven't yet spoken up... who are just becoming aware of what seems like an ambush by trail opponents.

Thanks,

Mike Verdu
Proud Cardiff Resident

184 comments:

  1. At the Feb. 26, 2014 Council meeting agenda item 11A was titled -
    Review of the Interstate-5 Widening Project – status update
    That staff report also included the General Plan (LCP) analyses of the SANDAG projects that included the rail trail. Much of the project is inconsistent with our General Plan. Instead of changing the project to make it consistent the city changed the General Plan. There will be no inconsistency that will be shown in the EIR.
    Here is the city staff report - check out the attachments

    http://encinitas.granicus.com/MetaViewer.php?view_id=7&clip_id=958&meta_id=37028

    The General Plan is the city's constitution.

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    Replies
    1. Things like the funding for this rail trail move at a glacial pace. If you can reform the City Council next summer, then this intrusive idiocy can go back to SanDag, where it belongs. Council just tried to pass 'no parking' along Vulcan and Birmingham and failed because Cardiffians showed up, further trying for narrowing this corridor; plus, Catherine is personally responsible, with NCTD;s Tony Kranz for the new fence going 5 miles along Vulcan from Chesterfiled to La Costa, cutting access off for generations of citizens used to crossing the tracks. The only folks who get killed by the train are suicides, not accidentals. Please stop this rail trail Cardiff. Even if it takes a referendum AND a recall of Blakespear, if that's her real name or not?

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    2. 5:56 AM

      Your reference to "Vulcan" as opposed to "San Elijo" makes me think you don't live in Cardiff.

      "The only folks who get killed by the train are suicides, not accidentals." While the majority of deaths are suicides, I don't think the 2 year old some years back was committing suicide when he wandered on to the track in Leucadia.

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  2. There is a groundswell. We don't need or want this trail. Signed the majority.

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    1. Great!

      Then you are wast--er, contributing your time and money to bring Proposition Duh to a city-wide vote, then?

      If you have a majority, then go for it!

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    2. This is more than comical. While no one can be sure if these are the same people, but there was so much angst here over the integrity of Peak Democracy yet many voices like 3:43 PM say the NoRailTrail website represents a groundswell when there appears to be no way to confirm its integrity and we already have reports of non citizen participation. I guess it really is a matter of whether the process helps you or hinders you. Nice to have a double standard.

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    3. It's called Spam, plain and simple. Fill out a form with your name and we'll flood people with emails. The guy from the North County Current was just on another site begging people to quit bombing their email with spam.

      Totally uncool.

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  3. Glad to see someone is speaking up for all the supporters of this infrastructure improvement. It's always the negative people who organize, and I'm glad to see this. Thank you, Mike Verdu.

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    1. Mike and his handful of supporters do not represent the majority of CBS residents. See we voted for Shaffer and Blakespear as they led us to believe they were "going to protect community chachter" turns out that like Bush and Obama they too lied. Now they want to up-zone CBS for 5 story Stack and Pack density to bring in more cars and pollution, paving over the tracks for parking meters and destroying our little original walking path to make CBS look like the Strand at Manhattan Beach zero bringing more cars, bigger carbon footprint and more pollution

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    2. Any evidence for this statement? "Now they want to up-zone CBS for 5 story Stack and Pack density to bring in more cars and pollution, paving over the tracks for parking meters and destroying our little original walking path to make CBS look like the Strand at Manhattan Beach zero bringing more cars, bigger carbon footprint and more pollution."

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    3. That would be a no....

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    4. 7:10 it would appear you are too lazy to have kept up with the proposed changes to the community. Yes, 5 stories are possible if the HEU passes, througout the city. Yes, this would increase the cities carbon footprint by more than 400%, Yes Lisa tax raiser Shaffer has proposed parking meters, yes the HEU plan, the planning department, all council members and developers want CBS to become OC by the sea. Don't be lazy, watch a council meeting now and then

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  4. Should we take $5M take-it-or-leave-it dollars from agencies outside the city budget to build a safer bike and pedestrian route away from high speed 101, connecting residential neighborhoods to Cardiff and downtown?

    Proposition Duh Passes with 94% Yes Vote

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  5. It's wrong to spend $8 million for the Cardiff Concrete Causeway to benefit a few people regardless of where the money comes from.

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    Replies
    1. Why don't you push for a city wide referendum. You can make the case that we should turn down $5M for a bike path and send the money to another town.

      Go for it!

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    2. If elected leaders acted responsibly with our monew we would not need grants,

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    3. If elected leaders acted responsibly with our monew we would not need grants,

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  6. More unneeded concrete. We had complete gridlock sunday late afternoon 101 at moonlight being jammed with no movement in all directions. Money can be better spent alleviating a growing problem vs. solving a problem that only exists in a few peoples mind. This is just another misuse of taxpayers $.

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    1. 6:48,

      If more folks had a safe route to bike or walk to the fair, then traffic at 101 and Moonlight would have been reduced.

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    2. 6:48 PM

      You do know there was a street fair Sunday.

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    3. Not true, to prove my point see the increase in traffic and parking on San Elijah above swami's. The rail trail is to destroy existing community character and create a concrete walkway and parking to benefit non-residents

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    4. 9:15, not true. The rail trail removes hundreds of parking spots.

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    5. No, the trail won't remove "hundreds" of parking spots. There will be some reduction offset by space to actually walk or bike.

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  7. The existing situation is not good. Helter-skelter parking on dirt shouldn't happen. If it's a parking area, pave it to prevent dust, and mark the parking spaces. The parking as it is now does create hazards for cars, pedestrians, and bikes, as there is no clear delineation between all the uses.

    Encinitas is a modern city, not a country village anymore.

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  8. It obvious that the supporters of this misguided rail trail project don't live next to it and won't be directly effected by it. There is plenty of space to put the trail west of 101 where users can enjoy the ocean and the beach. Leave our small community alone so we can continue to enjoy and not be cut off from the beach by a fence.

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    1. 5:48 AM

      I'm willing to bet that in the next 5 years there will be a fence whether or not there is a rail trail. Right now the second track along that section is a holding track but when more of the double tracking is installed, trains will be moving faster through there and therefore will be more dangerous. Let's see how you argue to NCTD that the fence blocks your illegal crossing of their tracks. I say this as someone who crosses the tracks all the time.

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    2. 5:48 a.m.
      I live on San Elijo Ave. and I wholeheartedly support the rail trail. I guess there goes your theory that there are no supporters who live on San Elijo Ave. Your post is an excellent example of one of the biggest problems regarding the negative side of this campaign. Comments are made as if they are fact. That's just wrong to speak for everyone. Also...while I am ranting we are not on an island. People come from all over North County, San Diego and cities beyond to enjoy Encinitas and Cardiff. Basic economics show they spend money here that ultimately benefits our citizens in a variety of ways. It would be great if as a community we tried to be more inclusive about sharing our section of paradise and embraced a variety of visions for the community...and not just yours because you are the loudest person in the room. Seriously, if you want to be in a small community where you can be alone...is this the right place for you?

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    3. Live right on San Elijo. Can't wait for the trail.

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    4. Just read this morning that NCTD is indeed planning a fence along the whole of their right-of-way with or without a trail. Better enjoy the wide open spaces while you can.

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  9. 2:58 A modern city? Really? Is that you vision for Encinitas? Well many of us have worked constructively to help Encinitas be unique. It seems we have had leadership with no vision trying to gentrify and Orange County-ize some unwanted vision. This rail trail exemplifies everything going towards crowded and ugly. There will be no beauty in a sea of humanity bringing more crowded behavior to this charming spot.

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    1. That battle was lost when cars were invented, well before Encinitas got incorporated. Growth in inevitable, the best we can do is to channel it.

      What? You want horses and goats and chickens in your yard, and dirt roads all over? Just go back to 1890! Or put a fence clear around Cardiff to keep the cars and trucks and visitors out. You can walk in or ride your donkey.

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    2. 6:20 AM

      I guess you haven't noticed all the growth going on around you outside of the Encinitas city boundaries. And don't forget how the coastal commission wants to make sure we make visiting our beaches as inviting and accommodating as possible. Maybe that's because the beaches are owned by the State. Unfortunately, the State won't allow us to setup checkpoints to verify that cars entering Encinitas are either residents or have a local destination and aren't just cutting through.

      It's just our little piece of heaven and screw everyone else.

      Before you get too upset, yes I want to preserve as much of Encinitas' uniqueness as possible but we have to find a way to accommodate growing demands.

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    3. "Demands" don't always have to be met, you know. There's a big, beautiful state out there with plenty of other places to live.

      As long as predatory developers and overinflated pensions remain the sole driver for so-called "progress," many of us will continue to oppose the cementing over of Encinitas in the name of "demand."

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    4. 11:28 AM

      '"Demands" don't always have to be met ...' Pardon my language but that is just total bullshit. Since 1980, San Diego County grew by over 1.2 million people. That impacts Encinitas directly and indirectly. That places demands on us to accommodate and respond to that growth as best we can while still preserving what is best about Encinitas. If nothing else the coastal commission demands cities like Encinitas accommodate the increase numbers of people wanting to visit our beaches.

      I don't call that progress or even "so-called progress". I call it reality which you obviously wish to deny. Yes there are plenty of other places to live so screw everyone else is your mantra. You've got yours.

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    5. Why do we have to accommodate? What is your justification for an actual need here? If more people show up than we have space for, why this "need" to provide? It's not I've got mine, it's we're built out - unless you're willing to render this town unrecognizable, which you may well be. I am not.

      Just because someone wants to live here doesn't mean they get to shoehorn themselves in and ruin the community character and quality of life that, I assume, is what attracted them in the first place.

      So what is the fundamental assumption underlying this "need?" I'm serious: I'm curious, because I don't see it.

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    6. 12:32 PM

      "Why do we have to accommodate?" Not even a few people? We know we can't accommodate everyone but no one?

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    7. I didn't say no one - but the HEU proposes 1,300 units more - and that would have a significantly detrimental effect on our town.

      I don't get why we don't seem to question the "need," all. If you said we need the tax base and developer fees to pay for overpriced trophy projects, pension obligations, or to do favors for (or are in fear of) bullying developers, at least we'd be having an honest discussion and would have a starting point.

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    8. 12:53 PM

      "but the HEU proposes 1,300 units more ..." You seem to forget the RHNA process. You can quibble with the numbers but the direction to the allocation process is in the statute. If the numbers were revised to 1,100 would that make a difference? Or a 1,000? Or do you think Encinitas is so special that all the other cities and the county should absorb our numbers, not us?

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    9. Coronado got 13 very low, 9 low. Del Mar got 7 very low, 5 low. Solana Beach 85 and 65. Why are they so special?

      What in the "statute" explains the inequality of distribution??

      The numbers were cut in half a year ago, then doubled back up within a month's time. Why was that? Double does make a difference and the "need" to have doubled the RHNA allocation remains a mystery. You have any answers? I don't.

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    10. 2:58
      Gentrify Cardiff? Really? That would be funny except for the fact that I think you are serious. Also, what is crowded behavior? Is that when a lot of loony words are tossed together in a sentence and presented as fact? If so, yea you're right. We don't need no damn crowded gentrification Orange County'ish like ugly behavior in these parts. Do we pardner? We are so unique and exceptional that we might just drown in our sea of humanity.

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    11. Sounds like rich white guilt to me. Cardiff is already gentrified. It wasn't intentional, just a case of supply and demand. Everyone wants to live here. Every time I rent out the second unit of my house, I get 40+ responses and at the end I pick one. That is just how it is. Then without fail a few of the people that were denied, beg and plead.
      Every location has a load that it can handle. I have first hand experience as to what happens when a towns maximum occupancy is exeeded.
      It is not pretty. In my home town a group of immigrants decided it was the new motherland and they started moving in 4 families to an apartment.
      All public places quickly became so over used that the city could not keep up with repairs, nor could they afford it. The city basically went to crap and all the original longtime citizens left. We clearly can't accommodate everyone that wants to live here, and maintain quality of life.
      They can still come enjoy the beach, or get a campground. I think this is where our inclusion is, and your guilt should disappear

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    12. 6:49 AM

      Dictionary.com defines Gentrification as the buying and renovation of houses and stores in deteriorated urban neighborhoods by upper- or middle-income families or individuals, thus improving property values but often displacing low-income families and small businesses.

      While Cardiff may have older, smaller houses looking a little tired, I wouldn't categorize it a "deteriorated urban neighborhood". But I do agree that long time residents who aren't all that wealthy, but well off nonetheless, are getting displaced by even more wealthy home buyers. This is occurring all over Encinitas which is why median home prices have been rising faster than the region at large.

      I don't know where "white guilt" plays into this unless you think that affordable housing means just brown and black folk.

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  10. I'm not sure how a landscaped trail can be equated with a blasted concrete hellscape that turns Cardiff into OC. It's not like they're going to pave over the entire space between the tracks and the road.

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  11. Overall I think this regional rail trail is a wonderful idea. I love trails. I even have a public trail abutting my fence! I also love using the trail, I just wish they were better connected. There's no reason why I shouldn't be able to go from my house in Olivenhain to Cardiff State Beach. I've tried and my machete is just not sharp enough! The fence thing seems a bit iffy, and I'm not sure I'm on board with the concrete (hard on the horse's hooves), but these are just details that can be worked out as the project progresses. So far I see nothing here that should prevent this project from moving forward.

    I have to say that reading these comments makes me somewhat nostalgic - just substitute "Hall Park" for "Rail Trail" and you'll get my drift.....

    - The Sculpin

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    1. Details don't get "worked out" when you have Masih Maher on the case! They get cement: "curbs, gutters, sidewalks" as far as the eye can see. Complete streets, baby!

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    2. 12:35 PM

      "... when you have Masih Maher on the case" It must be nice to have villains. So evil.

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    3. Clearly you are unacquainted. Must be nice to have your head that far buried in...the sand.

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  12. This community character mantra has become a one note orchestra.

    From my perspective, adding a bike and ped trail ADDS to community character.

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    Replies
    1. Agreed. When our community character is not inclusive, I don't think we can call it character.

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  13. Calling it a "trail" is good PR. It's also a lie. It's not a "trail." It's $8 million for a concrete causeway to benefit a few people who want to walk or bike between Cardiff and downtown Encinitas. There will be far more people on the bike and walking paths that already exist on 101. The number of people who now walk or bike on the dirt surface along San Elijo won't increase much when it's concrete.

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    1. That's a lie. I always go to SB to run their rail trail because it's safe and lighted. I could stay in enc but why bother ...It's dark, unkempt, and crappy looking. Build the rail trail and they will come.

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    2. "That's a lie" based what YOU do? Helluva way to make a judgment on something. SB seems to be working out for you, stick with it and leave Cardiff be.

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    3. The Solana path is DG. You really wanna run on concrete?

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    4. No. I want to skateboard on concrete.

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  14. Exactly. "They will come" have you noticed the quality of the "theys" lately? I noticed our new neighborhood watch newsletter was full of comments about rise in homeless, petty theft, and sketchy characters of late.

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    1. 5:15 really nails it.

      It is a well known truthish fact that bike trails are a magnet for violent crime, drugs and gang activity.

      You'll find that most of your crime-infested, poverty-stricken slums are also plagued with safe bike and pedestrian trails.

      Read your history books. Compton was once considered the Beverly Hills of South LA, but then they installed a bike path, and now look at it.

      At its core, this is a public safety issue. Not relating to the safety of bike and pedestrian travel, but rather to the safety of the town as a whole. Will our politicians be held to account when a gang of thugs on rollerblades attack and kill a group of disabled school children?

      I doubt it.

      Let's stop this insanity that will surely be the end of all that is good.

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  15. 3:36- You bring up a point I don't think has been discussed. Is this trail, or whatever we want to call it, going to be have lights? How will that affect the owners of the homes around it? I have not heard anything about lights so I was wondering if anyone knows anything about it?

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    Replies
    1. I hope it has lights. Loudspeakers to announce oncoming trains would be a nice touch, too.

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    2. I hear it will be lit with a laser light show that's synced up with a sound system that plays Call Me Maybe on an infinite loop.

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  16. Someone out there likes alliteration, and doesn't know what a causeway is.

    "In modern usage, a causeway is a road or railway atop an embankment usually across a broad body of water or wetland."

    The 101 across the mouth of the San Elijo Lagoon is a causeway. A bike path that is not artificially raised above open water or wetlands is not.

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    Replies
    1. Picky, picky. It's a call to concede that Cardiff Concrete Causeway is catchy.

      And it will cross Rossini Creek, right?

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    2. First World Problems....

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  17. Why is it that no one opposed to the rail trail wants to vote on it?

    I thought you had a "groundswell?"

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    Replies
    1. I vote, Yes! But wait a minute...that already happened! Yay!

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    2. I'm opposed to the San Elijo concrete bike path, and I would welcome a vote, so you're wrong again, 7:10.

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    3. 2:34pm - It WAS voted on. Where were you and your groundswell? In case you are confused, it was approved.

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  18. Replies
    1. Well, it will cause a way.

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  19. I lived next to a walking and bike path once, I was robbed a gunpoint while walking home, not to mention the neighbor who was stabbed. I'm sure they will add in some nice benches for transients to sleep on too!

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    Replies
    1. Yes.

      I was on a bike trail once, and a shooting war broke out between rival drug-dealing eliptibike gangs.

      There was a group of nuns and elderly war veterans slaughtered in the cross fire.

      I survived, but still have flashbacks and PTSD.

      Wake up people! Bike paths are a fast lane to urban slum.

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  20. I have enormous thys from my Elibitke and nver have I had a problim with local elibtibike gangs or have wanted to join them.

    - Sylvia

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  21. Use the $8 million to help homeless and other poor people. We well-off folks already have a dirt trail along San Elijo, and biking and walking routes along 101.

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    Replies
    1. You really don't know the facts. Please, I beg you, read the paper and get some information. Or at the very least email the city council so that you can become informed. The $8 million isn't coming out of the city coffers. I am so tired of hearing this tired mantra.
      The project is being funded by SANDAG from the county Transnet funds, NOT directly by the city. If the project were to be cancelled (God forbid,) the funding would go to the next project on the Bike Early Action Plan funding list. Use it or lose it, folks.

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  22. 11:27 makes an excellent point. That 8 million is taxpayer dollars. Why not use it for something a little more necessary than a trail? That could be a homeless shelter, mental health access, food for the poor, the list is endless. And before some of you go off on a rant about how it would be dangerous to the neighborhood, or whatever, please remember "There but for the Grace of God, or whoever or whatever you believe in, go any of us. I would welcome a shelter for people; better health services for our veterans or just plain ordinary folks; food baskets year round, etc. Maybe some of you think 8 million is nothing. But, for people on a fixed income, and there are many of those in our community, it could mean the difference between life and death, especially if we have the cold winter we are expected to have. Happy Thanksgiving to you all. LAG

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    1. Ah- 12:47- Perhaps that is really what we are fighting for? People who have lived here a very long time and are now retired are living on fixed incomes. They bought their homes when prices were affordable. The people moving here have money or they couldn't live here to begin with. When I moved here the area where Seaside Market is was a Value Faire and a Vons. Prices for ocean view homes were in the $90,000 range and rents were about $150.00/month. The community was filled with hippies, artists, and we all helped one another. Somehow, the new, more modern version is what some people are after. God forbid a homeless person be seen wandering our streets and we give them good. As we aged and had kids, they didn't have the fancy strollers we see now. They didn't have sidewalks and to the best of my knowledge they didn't die from walking on the street or on the dirt path. We have changed, and not necessarily for the best. I overheard 2 young mothers the other day talking about their kids in their strollers. One of them was angry because her husband would not let he buy the $2200.00 stroller she wanted, so she HAD to settle for the $1600.00 one. The women were dressed in their yoga stuff and were also complaining about how expensive "nannys" were. It was noon, so it appeared as if they did not work outside the home, nor possibly inside the home. Strange times.

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    2. Here's the flaw in your logic, 12:47.

      This isn't SANDAG coming down to citty hall with a suitcase of money asking what we want to do with the money.

      This is SANDAG coming to City Hall with a suitcase full of money, saying "We were forced to set a side this money as mitigation funds for double tracking. It is earmarked for a regional trail plan that follows our right of way from Oceanside to San Diego. This suitcase is earmarked for the Cardiff section of the trail. Do you want it or not? If you don't, we're going to blow it all on coke and prostitutes for our annual Christmas party, or maybe a Fabergé egg for our lobby."

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    3. 1:02, That dreary building could use a Fabergé egg in the lobby.

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    4. Please, I beg you, read the paper and get some information. Or at the very least email the city council so that you can become informed. The $8 million isn't coming out of the city coffers. The project is being funded by SANDAG from the county Transnet funds, NOT directly by the city. If the project were to be cancelled (God forbid,) the funding would go to the next project on the Bike Early Action Plan funding list. Use it or lose it, folks.

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    5. 3:07 PM
      Please explain the SANDAG Bike Early Action Plan.

      Delete
    6. 3:07pm Here is some info for you on the SANDAG Bike Early Action Plan. Copy and Paste from SANDAG website. You can get more information by searching for "SANDAG Bike Early Action Plan.

      Regional Bike Plan Early Action Program
      In a historic move that will make biking safer, easier, and more attractive for San Diegans throughout the region, the SANDAG Board of Directors on September 27, 2013, approved the Regional Bike Plan Early Action Program (EAP) – a $200 million initiative to expand the bike network countywide and finish high-priority projects within a decade.
      “This is the first time in the history of the San Diego region where a financial commitment of this magnitude has been made to dramatically expand bike infrastructure,” SANDAG Chair and Santee Councilmember Jack Dale said. “Our goal is to create a comfortable riding environment for people of all ages and abilities so biking can become a viable form of transportation. Getting more people on bikes is not just good for the environment, it’s also good for public health, the economy, and the overall mobility of the region.”
      Studies have shown that regions that have invested in bicycling have seen significant economic and health benefits. For example, a 2010 study estimated the annual economic impact of bicycle recreation and tourism in Wisconsin to be $924 million and the potential value of health benefits from reducing short car trips and increasing bicycle trips to total nearly $410 million. Another study, published in 2011, found that commuter and recreational cycling in Iowa generates more than $400 million in economic activity in the state and $87 million in health savings.
      The Bike EAP will be funded by TransNet, the regional half-cent sales tax for transportation approved by San Diego County voters. TransNet funding will be leveraged to bring in state and federal dollars so the region can complete more bike projects and reap even greater economic, health, and mobility benefits. By dedicating local funds for bike projects, the region will be well-positioned to compete for outside funding. SANDAG will maximize funding opportunities from other sources by moving all the bike projects toward construction on a rolling timeline, so at any given time there would be shovel-ready projects.
      The Bike EAP is the culmination of many years of planning efforts and the result of extensive public outreach. It builds on Riding to 2050: The San Diego Regional Bike Plan adopted in 2010 to provide a regional strategy for making the bicycle a useful form of transportation for every day travel. The EAP also helps to fulfill the vision laid out in the 2050 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions and reduce congestion by promoting alternative transportation. In addition, the program will become an important component of San Diego Forward: The Regional Plan, which is currently under development.
      Project Manager
      Chris Kluth, Senior Active Transportation Planner
      Phone: (619) 699-1952, Email: chris.kluth@sandag.org
      For media inquiries, please contact David Hicks at (619) 699-6939 or david.hicks@sandag.org.

      Delete
  23. Community Resource Center can always use more donations, especially this time of year. The rail trail is just an indulgence, put that money where it can serve someone in need.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Give to the Community Resource Center. That's a wonderful cause but it has NOTHING to do with the rail trail. The $8 million isn't coming out of the city coffers. The project is being funded by SANDAG from the county Transnet funds, NOT directly by the city. If the project were to be cancelled (God forbid,) the funding would go to the next project on the Bike Early Action Plan funding list. Use it or lose it, folks.

      Delete
  24. 1:02- I do realize that. Perhaps, instead of protesting the trail, we should be protesting how our money is being used in general.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's NOT our money (Cardiff/Encinitas). The $8 million isn't coming out of the city coffers.
      The project is being funded by SANDAG from the county Transnet funds, NOT directly by the city. If the project were to be cancelled (God forbid,) the funding would go to the next project on the Bike Early Action Plan funding list. Use it or lose it, folks.

      Delete
    2. 3:11 PM
      Other cities don't seem as anxious to have the bags of money from SANDAG for the BIke Early Action Plan. SANDAG needed a gullible city council that would enjoy destroy community character. Councilmembers Kranz, Shaffer, and Blakespear are shedding those crocodile tears of pity. SANDAG also needs to show mobile move to bicycles after losing the lawsuit.

      Delete
    3. Cryptic much? Does your post have ANYTHING to do with the rail trail and the free money from SANDAG? Council members are shedding crocodile tears? Because they voted for the trail and won? Or maybe, gullible city council members score millions from SANDAG in order to provide a walking/biking trail on a street in Cardiff in order to improve Cardiffians lifestyle. Sounds nefarious.

      Delete
  25. As someone who drives that stretch often, I've always felt that it looks like crap, especially between Santa Fe & Montgomery where every 50 yards is a light pole, electrical or cable box each with four bollards around it for protection. It definitely needs an upgrade.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree. If you walk on the path you will find dog poop in baggies left for someone else to pick up, used condoms (parked cars), empty bottles of alcohol thrown onto the tracks and/or broken beer bottles (parked cars) and any number of other items. It would seem that the Sheriff's department leaves these people alone unless someone calls in a complaint. Something better than a dirt parking lot with a great view would be nice.

      Delete
  26. There are many places in Encinitas that look worse than that stretch along San Elijo.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Trails boost crime, reduce value
    http://www.citizenreviewonline.org/2010/Dec/trails_boost_crime.html

    ReplyDelete
  28. After dark, Beach bike path becomes crime corridor
    http://www.pilotonline.com/news/after-dark-beach-bike-path-becomes-crime-corridor/article_56d58c71-1f94-5235-a7a0-e2f1d429472c.html

    ReplyDelete
  29. Headlines -

    Chico bike path crime supersedes benefit to cyclists, pedestrians

    Scary bike trail attacks put Houston cyclists on edge: Gangs of thieves and shooting from above

    Woman attacked on Sioux Falls bike trail

    Bloomingdale Trail Will Include Police on Foot, Bike Patrols, City Says

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 7:54pm...What were you thinking by quoting crime rates from from Chico, CA, Houston, TX, Sioux Falls, ID and Bloomingdate, IN.? What a reach! You have more problems than a bike trail if you think that there is a remote thread relevant in any way to Cardiff by the Sea, CA. and those articles.

      Delete
  30. What is going to happen to the folks in the composer section is what is already happening since the Swami's underpass went in. For all of you not living in this neck of the woods the drunks from the nearby bars wander curious to see where the underpass goes. When it keeps going south as planned they will head your way and you will get to experience in your quiet neighborhood what has happened in the highlands and other areas with the party crowd. Just wait and see or do something now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are those drunks walking or riding bikes?

      Delete
    2. LOL - it's an ant line of drunks walking 1.5-2 miles to Cardiff 'cuz they're curious

      Delete
    3. I live in the highlands, and I call BS.

      Delete
    4. I live in the BS, and I call highlands.

      Delete
    5. Yep...me too. BS for sure.

      Delete
  31. Oh my god these posts about the trail being a hotbed of crime are ridiculous. Is the current bike path on 101 a "crime corridor"? If we put a sidewalk on San Elijo, would that be a mini crime corridor? Where are all the criminals coming from, anyway? I guess we should fear the notorious thugs from Solana Beach (well known for their reign of terror along their pretty landscaped trail) or perhaps raids from the "Carlsbad Boyz", a well known gang from up north. Please.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Build it and the thugs will come, to paraphrase what proponents have said.

      Delete
  32. One of the Solana thugs fell into the train trench there, and that's suppressed their criminal acts since.

    The Carlsbad Boyz are trying to figure out how to get to Cardiff. They were flummoxed by the Coastal Rail Trail because it goes along Avenida Encinas rather than 101.

    Since they know only 101 and want to abide by Coastal Rail Trail rules, they're considering the Coaster for transit south. That would put them within walking, biking or skating distance of Cardiff and crime opportunities.

    They'll probably have their transit needs figured out by the time the Cardiff Concrete Corridor is completed. But then they'll have to find out if skateboarding is allowed there.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Since people are claiming that the existing sort trail is a fine bike and ped path. . .

    And since bike and ped paths are magnets for crime and violence. . .

    Ergo. . .

    Ipso Facto. . .

    We should immediately fence off the existing trail for public safety reasons.

    ReplyDelete
  34. The city has many trails in Olivenhain. Is the trail actually city owned or just an easement on the private property?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's my understanding that the trail is owned/managed by NCTD (part of SANDAG.) It's a use it or lose it grant from the state so even if we wanted to give it to schools or some other important cause, it's not possible. Seems a shame to waste the resources.

      Delete
    2. Goes back to the question, is the Cardiff Concrete Corridor the best way to spend taxpayer dollars?

      Seems it's a luxury where real needs are being ignored.

      The choice for the council was 101 or San Elijo. A majority chose San Elijo. 101 would have been a lot cheaper, and San Elijo will be only for locals. Others won't divert from 101 to San Elijo then back to 101 to continue north or south. They'll stay on 101.

      Ask Joe A. if your understanding of SANDAG, NCTD and funding for the project is correct.

      Delete
    3. Incidentally, Joe A. does not speak for all of Cardiff.
      The $8 million isn't coming out of the city coffers. The project is being funded by SANDAG from the county Transnet funds, NOT directly by the city. If the project were to be cancelled the funding would go to the next project on the Bike Early Action Plan funding list. Since the vote was "Yes" I don't think we are in danger of losing the resources but if there was ANY reason it was challenged, then in fact, it would be a shame. Email the Encinitas CIty Council if you have any questions. Do you own research and find out what's true and what is being spoon fed to you. Please don't get your information from a resident who has something to gain if it doesn't pass.

      Delete
    4. 3:24 PM
      There is planned 800 feet of retaining wall on the bluff side to support the rebuilding of San Elijo Avenue with the additional bike cement lanes. We have three councilmembers who are fools for money when it comes to protecting the environment.

      Delete
    5. And here he is now. (See above.)

      Delete
  35. http://www.cbs8.com/story/25247513/gruesome-murders-at-torrey-pines-beach-receiving-renewed-attention

    Uh-oh.

    I guess since I found a headline about a murder on a beach, we should conclude that beaches are dangerous violent crime hot spots.

    Maybe we need to close our beaches, too.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Regardless of what happens on Vulcan. The Hwy101 plans should be implemented ASAP and in my opinion in advance of the Vulcan Rail trail improvements.

    Most bicyclists will use Hwy101.

    Most bicyclists want a safe place to ride with low chance of being run over by a car.

    Creating the buffered bike lanes on Hwy 101 is more beneficial that the costs.

    The delay to vehicles is at intersections so look to convert long lead times to roundabout for serious improvement. But do we really want to improve the intersections?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll be happy to know that City Council has already discussed this. The 101 south of Swamis is due to be resurfaced. When that happens in the next year or two, Council noted that the existing roadway has room to be reconfigured to improve bike safety using only paint (basically no cost--striping needs to be done anyway when resurfacing happens).

      We're going to get improvements on both sides of the tracks.

      Delete
    2. 7:48
      You're gonna bum people out typing like that. No wait. They'll say it'll never happen.

      Delete
    3. Didn't know that the roadway path was going to be improved as well. We get to have our cake and eat it too.

      Delete
  37. Headlines -

    Police release video of Katy Trail robbery suspect

    D.C. Commuter Bike Trail Plagued By Crime to Get Safer With Addition of Mile Markers

    As Charlotte becomes more bike friendly, thefts rise

    ReplyDelete
  38. lolz - the hits just keep on coming

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This parade of unrelated headlines makes no sense.

      Delete
    2. It is a well known fact that there will be an increase in UFO abductions in Des Moines and Phoenix if Cardiff gets a rail trail! Can you live with that Cardiff? Everything we love and hold dear to our hearts hinges on whether we walk on dirt or whether we walk on cement while looking at one of the most beautiful vistas in the world. (Head explodes!)

      Delete
  39. Katy Trail is 240 miles long through secluded forestry flanked by Billy Bobs and illegal aliens. Cardiff is 2 miles of scorched open space with snobby Neighborhood Watchers with telescopes on every balcony. But you'll be happy to know for other reasons I still don't want the rail trail.

    ReplyDelete
  40. "Sacramento Police Asking Public For Help In Grant Union High School Shooting"

    Uh-oh.

    Better close all the schools, too.

    In fact, we should close every park, city hall, school, trail, street, restaurant, store, farm, home, theater, beach, train station, hotel, coffee shop, farm--shut it all down, because I can find a crime headline that takes place at all of these locations.

    ReplyDelete
  41. One time I was in a bike path, minding my own business, and--out of nowhere, an Al Qaeda cell on Segways attacked me and a group of blind orphans walking puppies.

    I now understand this is to be expected on bike trails.

    ReplyDelete
  42. This regional cement bike trail along San Elijo Ave. will be 20 feet wide on the west side of the street and 20 feet wide on the east side of the street according to the drawings. The car traveling lanes will be a total of 22 feet wide. A sixty feet wide street of asphalt and cement will be the future. Curb cuts will happen every 35 to 40 feet with breaks in the trail for the driveways.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In response...hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha! You do realize that there isn't 20 feet available on the west or the east sides of San Elijo and certainly NOT 60 feet across. A for effort, though! Where in the world do you get your information?

      Delete
    2. 3:35 PM
      Read the staff report from May 20, 2015 council meeting. Please find in the staff report the discussion of sharrows on San Elijo.

      Delete
    3. Sharrows don't change anything.

      They are simply a reminder to drivers of the rights cyclists already have to take the lane if they decide it's unsafe to pass.

      Delete
    4. Where are sharrows mentioned in the staff report of May 20?

      Delete
  43. Umm, no. From Chesterfield to Santa Fe, there will be a paved trail about 8-10 feet wide with an additional 4-5 feet or so of natural surface for walking. It won't be 60 feet wide. That's just silly.

    ReplyDelete
  44. 11:27 AM
    Better check those plans again. The drawings showed a bike trail on both sides of San Elijo Ave. The width will easily be 60 plus feet.

    ReplyDelete
  45. In her newsletter, Councilwoman Blakespear provided a nice summary of the project, her position on it, and her reasons for her position.

    She didn't say how much of the SANDAG-acknowledged $8 million cost will be solely Encinitas city taxpayers' money.

    The diagrams linked in her newsletter show two segments of what's called a trail. Both have the "trail" adjacent to the train, which would put the "trail" on the west side of San Elijo/Vulcan.

    The point remains: huge cost, tiny benefit for a few people who'll go between Cardiff and downtown Encinitas on that segment of the "trail." Everybody else will use 101.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's going to cost us about $2M, which is an 80% off sale.

      Delete
    2. Few people? How do you know that? If there was a more walkable path, I think many more people would use it to walk or bike between Cardiff and downtown Encinitas or vice versa. Are you concerned that you will look out your front window and see the riff-raff parading by in droves?

      Delete
    3. That only a few people will use it is pretty easy to figure out by looking at where it is. In relation to the population of Encinitas, how many people live close enough to the future "trail" to use it? And of that number, how many will actually use it?

      Guess what. The unavoidable, undeniable answer is a few.

      Huge cost ($8 million!) to benefit a few people. Doesn't sound like wise expenditure of public funds to me.

      Delete
    4. We are not on an island. This impacts more than just Encinitas. Even norailtrail website says that they have supporters in Alaska! If that is the true (questionable) then certainly there are supporters in Oceanside, Vista, San Marcos, Del Mar, etc.

      Delete
    5. The cost to Encinitas tax base is about $2M, and the project is located ajacent to our highest population density neighborhoods. It also connects two hubs of activity in downtown and Cardiff.

      Delete
    6. The cement rail trail is also needed to mitigate the 30 -40 units per acre of new housing density in Cardiff and downtown Encinitas as proposed in the housing element update.

      Delete
    7. 7:02 AM

      "The cement rail trail is also needed to mitigate the 30 -40 units per acre of new housing density in Cardiff and downtown Encinitas ..."

      I guess your strategy is to throw enough against the wall to see what sticks even if it doesn't make any sense.

      Delete
  46. Yes, i have the plans courtesy of norailtrail guys... and no, there's no 60 foot trail anywhere. Are you conflating the bike lanes on vulcan with the separate trail on san elijo? Or maybe confused by the proposal to make some small portions of san elijo a shared bike and car road because of the narrow bluffs?

    ReplyDelete
  47. From the defensive comments it looks like the anti trail folks have the upper hand. Doubt this unneeded trail will make it past residents discerning eyes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 4:35pm - You doubt this will make it passed (not past residents discerning eyes.) Hello and welcome to today. In the recent past, this issue was passed. Am I being defensive or just grammatically correct? (Probably just being a little "sh**!) Nonetheless, it would be great if you and your buddies wouldn't live in the past.

      Delete
    2. Reading this I almost past out. But I'll give you a past this time. Past me another trail plan like what has worked just fine in the passed.

      Delete
    3. Grammar can mess ya, man. ;-)

      Delete
  48. Read the previous posts on the grassroots post. The only person on the defense is Joe A.( I think I know what the A stands for)

    ReplyDelete
  49. Wouldn't it be cool if they made room for a Surrey rental concession at the South end of the farmer's market parking lot?

    Also, I'd love to see a concession kiosk selling coffee, juice, muffins, etc. with bike racks and tables just south of where the trail splits from San Elijo Ave. This section of trail is elevated with a spectacular ocean view. Would be a great spot to stop for a rest along the trail.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The concession revenue would be dedicated to maintenance and cleaning along the trail.

      Delete
  50. Two-mile-long swap meet with pedicabs and Segway rentals. Clowns on unicycles, dancing bears and hurdy-gurdy guys with monkeys on leashes, all licensed by the city to keep the revenue flowing.

    Encinitas and Cardiff become nationally known for their daytime carnival and nighttime bar scenes. City Council dreams realized, everybody who's lived here since before incorporation moves to Cayucos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cayucos sucks, man. You shoulda been there back in the day.

      http://www.newtimesslo.com/commentary/3390/those-were-the-days-cayucos-in-the-60s/

      No matter the place, there are always a few who live life in the rear view mirror.

      Sad.

      Delete
  51. Venice beach marries the Gaslamp. Wednesday nights are free comedy acts in the council chamber. Kranz, Shaffer, and Blakespear decide to profit on their act and charge $10 admission fee. Attorney Sabine rules fees aren't taxes. Some council reviewers see the three council/comedians as a revival of the three stooges.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Muir and Kranz invite residents to join their lose-weight competition, Shaffer forces all Encinitas businesses to be publicly administered, Gaspar and Blakespear hire out their kids to do housework and run errands for seniors in affordable housing, Sabine converts his practice to pro bono, condemns Marco Gonzalez for being an ambulance chaser, Meals on Wheels switches from cars to bikes for deliveries, Muir donates his pension to stop world hunger, Kranz signs the free-beer-for-life card at the Union, Cardiff Kook melted down to strike Cardiff Rail Trail admission tokens, Surfing Madonna gets tubed at D Street, 101 Main Street associations shut down, local economy soars, winter solstice comes and goes, 2016 is bliss for everybody except SRF devotees, they can't figure out why.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Council receives the state's most prestige government award from Jerry Brown - The town that has homogenized itself into San Francisco. Brown also buys one of the million dollar density bonus houses and immediately starts drilling for oil. Kranz and Gaspar declare every day Star Trek day and require the Sheriff's uniforms be trekkie outfits to bring in the tourists.
    Council decides to increase the amount of sand to be dredged onto the beach to include covering all properties inland to Village Park.

    ReplyDelete
  54. 1:25 - 1:46, great ideas!. But you forgot illuminated line dancing every Saturday night at the pier at Moonlight Beach; the world famous 17 mile drive around Encinitas; Panning For Gold in Cardiff; Eminent Domain Night at City Hall; Uber Rickshaws for all bike lanes and 100 more bus routes.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Wow, what a thread. Just wanted to update everyone. We're getting good traction with yesrailtrail.com and the associated FB page. Lots of email has gone out to the Encinitas City Council from trail supporters. We're now moving into the next phase of getting organized: We're collecting emails from supporters. We won't spam you or spam anyone else on your behalf. But if you care at all about the trail, hit us up at yesrailtrail@gmail.com.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 8:56 PM
      Do you know what exactly what design the council for on May 20? Not even the council knows. Do you suppose an 800 feet or longer cement retain wall on the bluffs next to San Elijo? Not even the Coastal Commission approves retaining walls on bluffs. Are you telling people about the retaining walls? Those electrical boxes will have to be underground. The bluffs will have to be stabilized to support them. The staff report on May 20 didn't include a discussion of sharrows or sharing lanes with cars or drawings. What did the three councilmembers approve? Provide the drawings.

      Delete
    2. The retaining wall is to stop the existing bluff and narrow road shoulder from eroding any further (putting the trail at risk). As you might have seen when walking along San Elijo, the bluff is unstable. Given time, there won't be much of a trail of any kind after a while. The retaining wall is actually a good thing. Really can't understand the goofy posts about the retaining wall being built to "support the weight of the trail" - no, it's to preserve what's left of the bluff so there is a trail in 10-20 years.

      Delete
    3. 10:38 PM
      No, a retaining wall on the bluffs isn't a good thing. Have you read the General Plan?

      Delete
    4. 10:38 PM
      The diagram you posted on your facebook page wasn't in the staff report of May 20. Where is the sidewalk and parallel parking along San Elijo depicted in the diagram you posted? Where in the diagram is the sidewalk and parking on the east side of San Elijo, with the houses, depicted?

      Delete
  56. Kranz, Shaffer, and Blakespear declare the NCTD 10 foot high rail fence with ribbon wire the biggest public arts display in North County. Trains will be stopped entering and leaving Encinitas to extract money from the passengers to view the famous art display. The famous $10 million in cost overruns lifeguard tower that is covered in dollar bills and with contract change dates stenciled on the stucco has increased tourists to Moonlight Beach.
    Lifeguards are so busy the council plans to build ten more lifeguard marine centers on Moonlight Beach. When residents pointed out there would be no beach left, the council had a ready answer - towers are more important than than sand. Kranz, Shaffer, and Blakespear all agreed that if one tower is good, ten towers are ten times better. Blakespear showed off her math skills by calculating the towers as towers to the 10th power. Shaffer was impressed.

    ReplyDelete
  57. I just hope the commenters here who are trying to be funny, and failing woefully, don't quit their day jobs.

    ReplyDelete
  58. 8:55- I do think it's funny. I'm sure they didn't quit their day jobs, but for many of us who have been actively involved in City politics for a long time, some of the things the posters wrote have actually been talked about. I'm sure they won't happen, but who knows what will? I still have not seen an actually artists rendering of what this whole thing will look like. Has anyone. I know several partial things have been posted on both of the Yes and No sites, but a full ariel view would not be hard to draw and perhaps we could get an idea of what exactly we are dealing with. So far, all I can understand is something's happening here, and what it is ain't exactly clear.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Given the history, homeless shelter library, prison like senior center, 40 acre park that's mostly just grass next to freeway, don't count on anything like solana beach has.

      Delete
    2. 11:28 AM

      Sounds like you aren't happy with anything. You've got your Bah Humbug in full throttle. It tis the season after all.

      Delete
  59. Motorized zip line incorporated into the plan without adding to the $8 million cost. Zip patrons charged modest fee according to interval zipped between Chesterfield and E Street. No weight limit for zip patrons. Zip line height provides stunning ocean and San Elijo-home views. Photography permitted.

    With the limitless opportunities the corridor offers, other uses are encouraged.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As I said, don't quit your day job.

      Delete
    2. No claim 12:08, demonstration.

      Delete
  60. Some very funny and entertaining posts above. Ignore the grumpy guy. Post more fun!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Obviously, you have a very low bar.

      Delete
    2. OK, 8:59, post an example of your so superior humor.

      Delete
    3. 11:11 AM

      Being able to recognize good comedy is not the same as claiming to be able to create it. I see now where the problem lies.

      Delete
    4. Brunette: If there's an explosion in a vacuum, could you hear it?

      Blonde: Is it on or off?

      Delete
    5. 3:44

      That joke sucks.

      Delete
    6. Only when it's on, 3:44

      Delete
  61. "Sounds like a great act. What do you call it?"

    "The Aristocrats"

    ReplyDelete
  62. Mr. Verdu,
    You need to correct your statements. According to a SANDAG presentation,
    In February 2014 there was a second community meeting and SANDAG received input on "a concept" east of the tracks.
    This concept was the Vulcan/San Elijo that had not been vetted.
    From the SANDAG paper -
    "After receiving input from the second meeting, a concept east
    of the tracks was drawn up that presented significant cost and
    constructability issues."
    Notice two of the drawbacks - significant cost and constructability issues.
    On page 11 of the SANDAG presentation is the diagram along the bluff along San Elijo Drive. The width of San Elijo including the walking/sidewalks on both sides, parking, car travel lanes, etc. is shown as 51 feet. The 51 feet doesn't include walking/sidewalks curb and gutter on the east side which could add another 12 feet to the width.
    On page 16 of the SANDAG concept for San Elijo are SANDAG comments on advantages and disadvantages.
    Corridor still has width constraints.
    Not enough room for southbound bike lane and parking on San Elijo.
    Not continuous for people walking Shared use path ends at Santa Fe.
    Engineering challenges and budgetary risk.

    Please let people know that this alternative rail trail on the bluff along San Elijo has major problems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 4:34 gives us a perfect example of what's called a "lie of omission." By erasing context and surrounding facts (also called "quote mining"), 4:34 creates the impression that the east alignment is not feasible.

      In fact, it is.

      There was an early design that exposed challenges. Then SANDAG redesigned the proposal specifically to address the challenges. The result was an alignment that will be beautiful, functional, and will add to our community character.

      From SANDAG:

      "In 2014, a concept was developed for a Class I shared use path in the North County Transit District (NCTD)’s rail right-of-way. Due to some project complexities, engineering/ construction costs, and feasibility concerns, the project team developed a new set of alternatives, both on city streets and in NCTD’s right-of-way.
      In April 2015, SANDAG presented two options at a community meeting: 1) along Coast Highway 101 and 2) a revised version of the previous concept in NCTD’s right of way, along Vulcan and San Elijo avenues. In May 2015, the Encinitas City Council directed city staff and SANDAG to develop plans to implement the second alignment option. Preliminary design and environmental work began in fall 2015."

      Delete
    2. 1:21 AM
      The city council approved the alternative that was part of the SANDAG presentation as discussed by 4:34 PM.
      You are using a lie of omission. Feasibility in this case is concrete over most of the dirt, building retaining walls while destroying the bluffs, and still not having enough room for the southbound bike land and parking on San Elijo.
      You don't spell out the project complexities, engineering construction costs, and feasibility problems.
      Your comments are in very general terms without the specifics. The council continually votes on projects without full descriptions and discussion of the disadvantages.

      Delete
  63. Shhhh, 4:34, you're not supposed to reveal those facts. You're supposed to support spending $8 million of taxpayer funds so Verdu and his neighbors get a wide concrete sidewalk between Cardiff and downtown Encinitas.

    By the way, everybody knows the $8 million is not only Encinitas taxpayers' money, but it is all taxpayer money. Is a concrete sidewalk that will benefit maybe a couple hundred locals the best way to spend $8 million of taxpayer money?

    ReplyDelete
  64. For heaven's sake...You people from Cardiff are being given a gigantic gift from the State without very much of our own investment and you're throwing a hissy fit! What's more you're trying to save a butt ugly dirt parking area with lovely ocean views. It's nothing more than an eyesore in it's current state but you've got a great view if you live in your car or on San Elijo. Time to learn to share.
    Hate to break it to you but cars are out! Walking is in, biking is in. Those of you who don't think a biking and walking path is a good idea will have a difficult time transitioning as 2015 comes to an end and the future stares you in the face. ANYTHING we can do to become less dependent on fossil fuel is a good thing even if that means you may have to give up a little dirt and ugly electrical and cable boxes accented by rusty bollards. Next thing you know we will all hear a rallying cry to SAVE THE RUSTY BOLLARDS!
    One final thing, go to the Leucadia Next Door thread on this subject and read how happy they are the CRT along San Elijo got approved. Those of you who keep saying that it's a waste of money for all of Encinitas would be wrong...again. I support the trail for all of Encinitas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think Cardiff folks have access to Leucadia Next Door. Perhaps you could post some excerpts and tally the pro vs con count?

      Delete
  65. Blogger - I hope this helps to give some perspective. All comments are about the Cardiff trail after it was passed by the city council May 30 - Jun 6. Here's your tally: 25 yes 2 no. (disclaimer: I removed names to protect posters. Seems some people like to make issues personal.)
    Original post: “The city council has just voted for the Rail Trail project from D St. to Chesterfield, to be on/along San Elijo and Vulcan Aves. rather than on the coast highway. Among other things, this proposal eliminates the existing ocean view parking along San Elijo, south of Cornish. It replaces it with parallel parking along San Elijo. In order to create enough width for ocean view parking with the bike and walking paths proposed, along this stretch, a retaining wall would have to be built, which has been deemed too expensive. If you think the loss of this ocean view parking is unacceptable, let the city council know.”
    Response: “While I'd love to preserve the view for those who park along San Elijo it seems the greater good is served by developing the Rail Trail project. Isn't the parallel 101 already too narrow?”
    “Seems to me to be a feature, not a bug. I favor development that gets people out of their cars. Perhaps the cars could park on the East side of San Elijo giving the homeowners some on street parking and making the ocean view unobstructed by automobiles. Its also the beginning of a kid safe way to get to Cardiff Elementary school from the North.”
    “I love this idea... I think having a safe trail is far better than Oceanview parking!”“Thank you (xxx) for the good news. hope a Trail Project is getting consideration north through Leucadia. Lack of safe sidewalks and bike paths have made North Vulcan our most dangerous road!”
    “I wholeheartedly agree...anything that gets people out of their cars benefits the greater good. There are many better ways to enjoy an ocean view for free rather than parking and sitting in a vehicle. It seems to be a poor use of open space.”“Walking, jogging, running, biking, and standing with sunset /surfing views, great news (I call it classy beach town progress ). Parking is not the future, and look how nice the Solana Beach under ground railway is; with MORE public safer access, across the tracks.”

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  66. Just to be fair, I would like to include the entire post with all comments so that some people don't accuse me of editing out negative comments. These are in the order of the postings.
    “I agree with those commenting here -- a rail trail is a wonderful addition to our community. We can still have ocean-view parking... we'll just be parking our bikes instead of our cars! If we keep insisting that motor vehicles are prioritized over active transportation even as our population to continues to grow, we risk creating so much air pollution it will threaten *everyone's* coastal view.”
    “I am strongly in favor of the plan as written. I don't care one bit if the cars can't see the ocean. Creating a safer, more useful biking and walking trail is an especially good idea, and the Council has done the right thing.”“Hmmm, ocean view parking.. I did not know that that was an open space amenity. Maybe it is a SoCal thing. Since I live in Encinitas Highlands, I kind of like the idea of WALKING to view the ocean/sunset, sitting on a bench on a safe path that is not next to somebody blaring their "tunes" out of their truck they can't be bothered to get out of to stand on mother earth (no disrespect to those who are unable). I don't think I will miss the rogue camping RVs, commercial trucks and potholes either. It is true, as we get more and more crowded inland, more cars will park in the neighborhoods. Then there will be parking meters and neighborhood parking permits. It will come. But at least there will be somewhere to walk safely.”
    “I am not in favor of the plan. Bikers at 6:00 am on the weekend are very noise shouting at each other, etc. I know, I'm one of them. I vote to keep them on 101.”
    “I think the packs of serious cyclists you refer to are likely to continue to use the 101 rather than detour off it for so short a distance.”
    “Thanks for letting us know. So happy to hear this project is moving forward to benefit all of the members of our community.”


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  67. And more...we will eventually get to the negative comments. Hang tight!
    “This is a great victory for those of us living between 101 and the 5. Imagine a safe spot to walk, run, bike without having to cross the tracks. Nice addition to the neighborhood.”
    “I'm very much in favor of the rail trail - I only wish that it would extend a bit further north! More goodness for Cardiff and Encinitas, nothing for poor ol' Leucadia, sniff!”
    “Now I hear everyone's comments about cars, and the evil thereof. Even so, I feel it is a bit heavy handed. I drive the stretch of San Elijo most mornings - I drive from Leucadia into Cardiff to get my coffee, and then I drive the same route back to E Street, and then off to the 101 and to work at our shop in the Lumberyard. It's lovely, truly. Sometimes it is the only chance I get to enjoy the ocean breezes - I may not have the time every day to bike or walk to the sea, but I remind myself why I live here! Sometimes on my way back I'll pull up onto the ridge right by Cornish and check out the surf at Swami's. I may only be there a few minutes, hardly ever more than 20 minutes or so. I'm not abandoning my car all day to spoil everyone's view, I'm just soaking in some goodness. I know I'm not the only one who does this - I see you! I'm envisioning a nice little pull-off as part of the rail trail - not parking per se, just a short stretch where working folk can pull over for 5 or 20 minutes and check out the view. Ticket or tow anyone who leaves their car there! Let's all learn to live together.”
    “Thanks for the thoughtful contribution to this discussion, xxx. I have a few quick points to make regarding cars and San Elijo.My understanding is there will be parallel parking along the rail trail, so there should no lack of places for people to park and enjoy the view, even if they don't want to exit their cars to do so.Also, the parking with excellent view along the southern-most block of Cornish will still be available for those who want to stay in their cars and face the surf.I don't think most contributors to this discussion think cars are evil. I think the proposed trail will allow cars, cyclists, joggers and walkers to equitably enjoy that stretch of San Elijo safely.”
    “I hear the angst in some of the comments but hear more thumbs up. Seems the proposed Rail Trail will benefit "all" who want to take advantage of the oceanview, etc. it's also true that not everyone in Encinitas cares for the ocean. A lot of the walkers, cyclists come from points north, east and south who want to enjoy the community, eateries, shops, coffee (especially cyclists) that Encinitas has to offer.I too wish the rail trail would include Leucadia. I've given up running and cycling along Vulcan due to lack of room and speeding cars. My opinion is that parked cars from La Costa to Birmingham are by and large park and ride commuters or surfers. Particularly since most cars are parked all day with no activity. If the vast majority of folks don't use these areas for weekend parking, when the average person wants to bike, walk, run, etc., should their desire be denied for the very few, of the overall population, who want to park for convenience, view the once a day sunset or provide off street parking for residents. The Solana Beach rail trail is a wonderful example of weaving a pedestrian and cycling vehicle into the community. I'd like to see the Encinitas ruling include Leucadia so that the the entire span of coastal rail opportunity is covered for the present and the future.”

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  68. Finally...
    “I too wish it included Leucadia. Has anyone heard, whether in person or via meeting minutes, why Leucadia is not being included?”
    “Have not but would be good to know”“why spend all the money to begin with”“The Leucadia segment is also being considered as part of the North Hwy 101 Streetscape. Let the city council know you support the Cardiff project and want the Leucadia segment as well. Council@encinitasca.gov”
    “Please let city council know that we want Encinitas included in the rail trail project! The segment of the rail trail that is *supposed* to be included is from Chesterfield to D St. The proposed project voted on STOPS at Santa Fe. I hope they will amend the project to include the area from Santa Fe to the Pacific Station parking lot, where at least there are sidewalks.”
    “I agree w most comments. I have enjoyed pulling over on my way to and fro for decades. The rail trail with additional pedestrian crossings is the best for the most. Yes, too, to xxx's comments and suggestions. Contact our council and share your thoughts about Leucadia needing these improvements equally or more so. The first phase Leucadia streetscape could be decades away from phase two or three, if ever. If you agree, tell the council we need to have the entire streetscape developed in one phase, with pedestrian crossings. I have never seen phase two or three completed in Encinitas. Thanks to council for funding 100 % drawings for Leucadia Streetscape. This should assist in grant funding.”
    “I'll be letting Council know, again, that the railtrail should extend through Leucadia INSTEAD of six new roundabouts, which bicyclists would be forced to go through. xxx and I support the Highway 101 streetscape through all of Encinitas and Leucadia, but not six roundabouts through Leucadia, only.”
    "I am in favor of the recent Encinitas City Council decision to put a rail-trail path east of the railroad tracks, on the side of the tracks where the residents live. The existing bike route along Highway 101 in Encinitas will remain and continue to be used by the committed road bikers. The rail-trail path in the railroad corridor will be for walkers and families and the more cautious types who still want to bike but don’t want to ride next to zooming cars. This is the best of both worlds. Some are fearful that our beach access will be lost. The truth is that the railway or the police could close down the illegal access at any time by ticketing or fencing without our consent. The railroad has the clear legal right to do that. I think the current Encinitas City Council is committed to ensuring that we have permanent and rightful access to the coast, which will make it easy and safe for people to walk to the beach. There are many people who feel exposed and uncomfortable crossing the railroad tracks and the highway without a legal crossing, for example older people and those with strollers or young children. Additionally it looks like the city doesn’t have to pay for most of it, which means our city can continue to invest in other important things. I look at the fine job Solana Beach did with its beautiful rail trail, and the wonderful job our city did with the pedestrian underpass at Santa Fe Drive and this gives me confidence that I will also like the new separated bike and walking trail on the east side of the railroad tracks through Cardiff.”

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  69. http://us12.campaign-archive1.com/?u=d4230cc8a1de24f82249be963&id=2e3b0912be&e=80d31ecd20

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